uh oh

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  1. Comment by SondraK, Queen of SondraKistan — October 8, 2014 @ 10:25 am

  2. Is obola going have a national funeral and day of mourning for the “victim”?

    Comment by bo1921 — October 8, 2014 @ 10:26 am

  3. Oh, look who’s playing the Race Card

    Comment by Fawkes News (Fun Lovin' Thought Criminal) — October 8, 2014 @ 10:27 am

  4. this is what ebola is:
    http://www.nairaland.com/1848781/scary-pictures-ebola-virus-victims

    this is what our government does:
    http://michaelkonik.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/03/TSA-Agent.jpg

    Comment by jlw — October 8, 2014 @ 10:30 am

  5. My sister-in-law was stressing about this the other day. There are things to keep in mind.

    1) Yes, it is a nasty disease with a high mortality rate. But part of the reason its mortality rate is high is because outbreaks usually occur in the 3rd world. Health care and common sense practices there are left wanting.

    2) It seems to be harder to catch than a cold or flu. Unless it mutates, it shouldn’t spread too bad. Even in Africa, the outbreaks don’t last very long. This is the worst Ebola outbreak on record.

    3) If it comes to your area, you should have advanced notice. Chances are, you won’t be the first one to contract it. You can take preventative steps like mask, gloves, and bleach on the shopping cart handles.

    4) It’s a tropical disease. This tells me that, like malaria, you could always retreat to a northern state like Idaho if worse comes to worst. I’d be more than happy to help a fellow Kisper relocate.

    5) Rarely does the feared crisis come to pass. It’s almost always the thing you don’t anticipate that bites you.

    6) You can’t do anything about it spreading in any case. Be vigilant, use good sense, don’t listen to the noooooz or the gobbermint, they all lie, and you should come through without melting into a pile of goo.

    Comment by Paladin — October 8, 2014 @ 10:44 am

  6. The most important thing to know is not to believe anything this administration tells you.

    Comment by geezerette — October 8, 2014 @ 11:18 am

  7. Somehow, we allowed this disease-ridden foreigner into our country with little more defense than asking “How are you today?”

    Strike One!

    We’ve sent 3000 military members into Harm’s Way to help treat the ill and infirmed. They will be in the heart of disease country, and eventually they will be coming home, bringing with them whatever they might have been exposed to while they were gone.

    Strike Two!

    Center for (Wishful) Disease Control tells us there is nothing to see here; keep moving, Citizens!”

    Would our own Government lie to US? EVER???

    Strike Three!

    Simple fact of disease progression is: One becomes two; two become four; four become sixteen… etc., etc.

    This disease should never have left third-world Africa. It should NEVER have made the shores of America! Too many people in Washington and elsewhere are trying way too hard to be P.C. and not giving enough concern to how many innocent Americans will die in the process.

    One more example of how O’Bummer is looking out for America!

    Comment by Mike(AZ) — October 8, 2014 @ 11:25 am

  8. Read the closing of “The Hot Zone.”
    This virus has simply not existed in the United States.
    It now does exist here. It’s not gone.
    It is just waiting to latch on to its next victim.
    If you think that American medical care, practices, and prevention methods are perfect then I have a bridge to sell you. All you can hope for is that it hasn’t been spread to other hosts and given an opening for a breakout.

    Comment by Hopefulone — October 8, 2014 @ 11:29 am

  9. Even though it is October, the temps here in northern CA are still in the 90s. Typically, Fall turns into Winter sometime in late October or early November. Then temps go down to 50s day and close to freezing at nights.

    I will feel better about this ebola flap when winter comes here, where I live…..

    Comment by Colonel Jerry USMC — October 8, 2014 @ 11:29 am

  10. I’ve been wondering how effective a water & bleach solution would be against ebola when it comes to the virus living outside a host for any length of time.

    If even a mild bleach solution will kill it effectively, it might be time to start carrying a small spray bottle of said solution with you when you have to go out in public. Us it on door knobs, gas pump handles, shopping carts, and so on.

    Comment by Caged Insanity — October 8, 2014 @ 11:37 am

  11. So, will Duncan’s corpse be the Guest of Honor at Burning Man, in Nevada? No?

    Still, Ebola seems to be a tricky virus. Sneaks up on people, unlike the AIDS, where it’s said that a common “first symptom” is a persistent pounding in the ass.

    Oh well. I’ve got several months supplies on hand. I can quite literally, seal the house, and not have to leave, just so long as there’s water for flushing. And even then, I’d only have to dig slit-trenches in the backyard, for the duration.

    And, I’ve got lazer measured range-cards for every feature and bit of cover within line of sight.

    Jim
    Sunk New Dawn
    Galveston, TX

    Comment by Jim — October 8, 2014 @ 11:43 am

  12. It’s only going to take one person, who breaks protocol.
    Remember the PVT. in The Stand?

    Comment by LostLiberty — October 8, 2014 @ 1:13 pm

  13. All potential pandemics must be treated with the utmost seriousness. They have the potential of collapsing the health systems and economies of the US and elsewhere.

    It’s not just the health and economic effects that are dangerous.
    Consider the likelihood of mass migration by residents of hard-hit areas into lightly hit areas. There is no “safe zone.”

    While we’re on the subject of pandemics,
    let me recommend The Last Centurion* by John Ringo.
    Yeah, it’s military sci-fi, but it’s conservative, Ayn-Randish military sci-fi, and it deals with a next-year post-pandemic world without pulling punches. Good stuff!
    Sure, maybe it’s a little too mythological-heroic for this ol’ guy’s normal taste, but just go with it — it’s a terrific must-read.
    _______
    * Bocopro recommended it a few weeks ago. So did Allen, back in ought-twelve.
    Thanks.

    Comment by DougM (paleface™) — October 8, 2014 @ 1:41 pm

  14. First, I wonder if the .gov will insist that Duncan be shipped back to Liberia for burial because – sensitivity.

    ^(7) Mike (AZ) – We’ve sent 3000 military members into Harm’s Way to help treat the ill and infirmed. They will be in the heart of disease country, and eventually they will be coming home, bringing with them whatever they might have been exposed to while they were gone. – Strike Two!

    Only saving grace here is that the military can put those people in quarantine for 30 days without a lot of bitching about human riiiiiights!!.

    And if Obola tells them not to then they have yet another opportunity to grow a fucking pair and stick to their guns on this matter.

    Comment by Lord of the Fleas — October 8, 2014 @ 2:25 pm

  15. If anyone has noticed at all, my blogging mojo’s taken a dry spell for a bit and much of it is because nothing is really fucking funny anymore………..

    Comment by SondraK, Queen of SondraKistan — October 8, 2014 @ 3:47 pm

  16. ^ Ya can’t think that way, Headmissy. Everything has a funny side. Plus, humor is essential for maintaining one’s sanity.

    Just look on the bright side.

    Comment by Fawkes News (Fun Lovin' Thought Criminal) — October 8, 2014 @ 5:27 pm

  17. One of our local radio stations sent a reporter out on a “man in the street” interview gig. The announcer said she wore a mask, had an almost-hazmat suit on, and carried a glass jar with the “biohazard” logo.

    The cut they decided to play was: she asks the person if she could ask a question about Ebola.

    The response: “Who’s Ebola?”

    On the tape, the reporter replied, “Perfect answer”.

    The country’s in the very best of hands.
    Paladin (#5): Good work. There’s a site Out There (I think I found it searching for “ebola history” that gives the whole list, starting in 1976 (when it was first noticed). They give for each outbreak the number affected and the % mortality. Most of the 100% cases are one person.

    DougM: “Consider the likelihood of mass migration by residents of hard-hit areas into lightly hit areas. There is no “safe zone.””

    What do you suppose would happen if there was to be a significant outbreak in South America?

    SondraK: Sometimes there is no funny side. Although there is a scene in Monty Python and the Holy Grail that fits.

    Comment by ZZMike — October 8, 2014 @ 7:39 pm

  18. If anyone has noticed at all, my blogging mojo’s taken a dry spell for a bit and much of it is because nothing is really fucking funny anymore………..

    That’s a relief; I thought we’d all failed you somehow.

    Well, I’d failed you.

    I think we’re all going through a sort of low “What has that shithead Kenyan done this time?” period.

    It gets so old watching him and his minions doing things against the best interests of this country “every frickin’ day!”

    Comment by rickn8or — October 8, 2014 @ 7:47 pm

  19. ^ I’ll reach inside for my inner inappropriate and be back on track soon :)

    Comment by SondraK, Queen of SondraKistan — October 8, 2014 @ 8:46 pm

  20. Paladin 5: I’d agree it isn’t time to panic (yet). However:

    Even in Africa, the outbreaks don’t last very long.

    My impression is that is because in the past there wasn’t so much mobility out of the isolated village areas where Ebola tended to break out. Once it (swiftly) killed everyone in the village, it had burned itself out…

    …but now, as our Leftist “friends” are so fond of telling us, we have a Global Village.

    Also, it is starting to look like we don’t know how easy or hard this particular strain is to catch. There’s stories about new cases in both Spain and Texas that, with regard to communicability, do not look good.

    Comment by Ironic in Denver — October 8, 2014 @ 9:56 pm

  21. Ironic (20)

    Ebola truly is a nasty disease.

    However, I see a lot of hype.

    Hype is bad because it freaks out a lot of people. Every single infection is given bold headlines. On the other hand, the hype makes everything get scrutinized which is a good thing.

    The headlines I see have people getting checked out for Ebola-like symptoms (i.e. flu) but it’s still too early to tell what it is exactly.

    All that being said, I agree that it’s still too early to tell precisely how contagious this strain is. Yet I do think if it were highly contagious that we would be seeing a lot more cases.

    And all the latest news makes me want to read Earth Abides by George R. Stewart again.

    Comment by Paladin — October 9, 2014 @ 9:14 am

  22. # Miss Queen Sondra————-your daily finds are a big help for all us on the porch.

    Comment by geezerette — October 9, 2014 @ 12:42 pm

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